Available courses

This course examines the history of Armenia, its land and people. The course will cover history from antiquity to the early modern age (beginning of the 16th century). The course examines the geopolitical, economic, religious and socio-cultural development of Armenia and explores the relationship between Armenia and other countries. Students will critically examine historical events, processes, actors, and models of history writing.  Students will work individually and in groups to integrate evidence from various sources in order to develop a greater understanding of Armenian history. 

This course examines the history of Armenia, its land and people. The course will cover history from antiquity to the Early Modern age (beginning of the 16th century). The course examines the geopolitical, economic, religious and socio-cultural development of Armenia and explores the relationship between Armenia and other countries. Students will critically examine historical events, processes, actors, and models of history-writing. Students will work individually and in groups to integrate evidence from various sources in order to develop a greater understanding of Armenian history. 

The course examines religion as a phenomenon of human culture. It firstly introduces the students to the main theoretical approaches and methods through which religion has been studied by historians and social scientists. Secondly, the course looks at the major themes in the study of religion. These themes will be examined drawing on particular religious traditions and through the lens of the theoretical approaches covered. Readings will include theoretical writings about religion by classics and contemporary authors, and primary texts from various religious traditions and by representatives of those traditions. The course combines lectures, in-class discussions, and analytical essays. Its broader aim is to give the students an understanding of the richness of the religious traditions of the world, and to develop skills to analyze religious phenomena and to situate them in their historical contexts. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

Energy drives the human civilization, and any economic growth or poverty alleviation directly involves use of energy resources. This course serves as an introduction to various sources of energy and the mechanisms to harness and convert them to more useful types of energy. Fossil fueled, solar, hydro and nuclear sources and some of their effects on the environment and safety issues will be discussed. This course fulfills general education requirements of the American University of Armenia. There are no prerequisites for this course beyond basic mathematical skills. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

The course highlights and discusses the practical chemical world of human beings and the chemical nature of everyday processes. The role of chemistry in necessities of daily life such as the chemistry of life, agriculture, food, healthcare, clothing, housing and household goods (e.g., toys and furniture), transport and communications will be discussed. In addition the course will introduce various applications of chemistry in the area of arts, crime and law enforcement, consumer products, cosmetics and warfare. As a science-based, quantitative course, the course will teach students the methods of scientific inquiry, including experimental design and chemical analytical methods, data generation and analysis, and presentation of the final results.

Decision making in the many fields relies on the ability to conduct research and critically interpret data. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of survey research, advancing their understanding and skills in social science research methodologies. Students will critically analyze data and results from survey research and public opinion polls. They will also learn how to collect, analyze and interpret original survey data. Assignments may include reading, individual and group projects, fieldwork, written assignments, and oral presentations. Instructor-led discussions/class time including discussions and tasks.

In this course students will explore the ethnic and religious minorities in the modern Middle East. Through lectures, discussions and examination of primary and secondary sources students will critically examine the concept and role of religious and ethnic minorities in state policies and the relations between minorities, majorities, and states in the wider region between Egypt and Iran. Students will discuss the meanings and limits of concepts such as “coexistence”, “tolerance”, “cosmopolitanism,” and “pluralism.”

We will discuss what role the category of minority and minority politics played in the formation of the modern nation-states and the majority national identities of Middle Eastern states. How the minoritization of various communities in the Middle East served colonial politics? What does the category of minority have to do with geopolitics? While taking into consideration such political questions, through films and some readings we will look at how common people experienced becoming minorities in their home countries. We will approach the study of minorities from the perspectives of various disciplines including history, anthropology, political science, literary studies, and geography.

This course aims to explore the developments in Europe during the Enlightenment through the lens of the aesthetic category of the Baroque. The course examines the distinctive characteristics of the cultural, social and political spheres in the Baroque era, their interdependence, and their continuing relevance. Through close analysis of texts, political, music, painting, architecture, and intellectual history, students will develop critical thinking skills, the ability to distinguish aesthetic eras and draw parallels across disciplines, and learn to view cultures from different perspectives, while gaining knowledge that will enable life-long learning and enrich their appreciation of the lasting legacy of the Baroque. Instructor-led class may include lectures, discussions, case studies, readings, group work. Assessment may include class participation, papers, essays, quizzes, exams, projects and presentations.

This course provides practical, proven tools for transforming an idea into a product or service that creates value for people.  As students acquire these tools, they will learn how to differentiate between good and bad ideas, how to build a winning strategy, how to shape a unique value proposition, design a business model, compare the innovation to existing solutions, build flexibility into a plan and determine when best to quit.  This course guides students through the process of actively validating ideas in the market.  Students are encouraged to identify and communicate good opportunities and to create and capture value from those.  Students will receive feedback that systematically tests different parts of their business idea and develop confidence in pitching ideas to investors and customers; instructor-led discussions and lectures; assessment through projects, exams, assignments, and presentations.

Welcome to ENV 203: Environmental Monitoring

The course is to present general procedures, methods, theories and techniques in the monitoring programs for different environments. Environmental contamination in air, water and wastewater, soils, and food will be discussed with the emphasis on instrument selection and quality control, including documentation, calibration, and sample management. As a science-based, quantitative course, the course will teach students the methods of scientific inquiry, including planning and designing monitoring, biological and physical-chemical analytical methods, data generation and analysis, and effective presentation of the final results. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

Without adequate supply of freshwater our economies will not function and our health will not be secured. Human overuse and pollution of freshwater can also cause political conflict as well as damage ecosystems. This course will examine water from various perspectives including ecological, human health, resource stewardship, economic, and legal/political. Specific topics to be covered include water supply and use in manufacturing, mining, energy, agriculture and domestic life; potential for resource efficiency and optimization; water quality and types of water pollution, methods of testing and monitoring water quality and conditions of freshwater ecosystems; water purification and waste water treatment; water planning and management tools/models including those for watersheds, surface, and ground water resources; new technologies, such as desalination, to access freshwater; and international and national laws on water.

Without adequate supply of freshwater our economies will not function and our health will not be secured. Human overuse and pollution of freshwater can also cause political conflict as well as damage ecosystems. This course will examine water from various perspectives including ecological, human health, resource stewardship, economic, and legal/political. Specific topics to be covered include water supply and use in manufacturing, mining, energy, agriculture and domestic life; potential for resource efficiency and optimization; water quality and types of water pollution, methods of testing and monitoring water quality and conditions of freshwater ecosystems; water purification and waste water treatment; water planning and management tools/models including those for watersheds, surface, and ground water resources; new technologies, such as desalination, to access freshwater; and international and national laws on water.

This course will introduce students to the environmental and social challenges from a holistic, practical, and interdisciplinary point of view, employing the approaches of systems thinking and life-cycle analysis. Interactive group activities will allow experiencing the complexity of some of the systems under investigation. By the end of the course, students will be able to approach complex problems from a systems point of view, describing complexity of human-environment relationship, developing causal loop diagrams, identifying life-cycle stages of the products and services including their carbon and material footprints. The course will also discuss alternative schemes such as sharing economy and circular economy.

What is the relationship between religion and politics? This course examines the meanings of and interactions between, religion and politics in comparative politics and international relations. Contrary to theories about toward secularization recent developments underscore the important role religion continues to play in world politics. In many countries religious beliefs, practices and institutions shape individual values, social organizations, state institutions and international. The course will examine trends and theories on the of religion in public life, in state and global politics, including separation of church and state (i.e., state secularism); nationalism and religion; war and peace; non-discrimination, and gender issues. Issues of religion, church and state in Armenia will also be discussed in the context of global developments. Assessment will include tests, essays, and presentations.


Courses