Available courses

This course examines the history of Armenia, its land and people beginning with the early modern age through the establishment of the modern Republic of Armenia and renewed independence in the 21th century.  Students will explore Armenian history in its geopolitical, economic, religious and socio-cultural contexts. Students will critically examine historical events, processes, actors, and models of history writing. Students will conduct independent research using primary and secondary sources to analyze issues through a comparative lens and evaluate and synthesize evidence and arguments from various disciplines. Students will analyze Armenia’s history in a global context in order to anticipate challenges and opportunities for development.  Instructor-led discussions.

This course examines the history of Armenia, its land and people beginning with the early modern age through the establishment of the modern Republic of Armenia and renewed independence in the 21st century. Students will explore Armenian history in its geopolitical, economic, religious and socio-cultural contexts. Students will critically examine historical events, processes, actors, and models of history writing. Students will conduct independent research using primary and secondary sources to analyze issues through a comparative lens and evaluate and synthesize evidence and arguments from various disciplines. Students will analyze Armenia’s history in a global context in order to anticipate challenges and opportunities for development.

The course examines religion as a phenomenon of human culture. It firstly introduces the students to the main theoretical approaches and methods through which religion has been studied by historians and social scientists. Secondly, the course looks at the major themes in the study of religion. These themes will be examined drawing on particular religious traditions and through the lens of the theoretical approaches covered. Readings will include theoretical writings about religion by classics and contemporary authors, and primary texts from various religious traditions and by representatives of those traditions. The course combines lectures, in-class discussions, and analytical essays. Its broader aim is to give the students an understanding of the richness of the religious traditions of the world, and to develop skills to analyze religious phenomena and to situate them in their historical contexts. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

The course examines world religious traditions from a comparative perspective. Students will be introduced to the basic tenets, worldview, and practices of the major religious traditions around the world, polytheistic traditions, Asian religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam, as well as new religious movements. The course will also examine the sacred texts of various religions. Upon completing the course, students should be familiar with the key beliefs and practices of the major religions and gain an appreciation of the diversity of religious experience through time and across cultures. The course also aims to equip students with concepts and frames for thinking critically about the relationship of Christianity to other religious traditions and comparing the dogmatic, doctrinal and ritualistic practices within various religious traditions. The course combines lectures, in-class discussions, and analytical essays. Three hours of instructor-led class time per week.

In this course students will explore in-depth themes related to the phenomenon of genocide with emphasis on a comparative analysis of the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, the Cambodian genocide, and Rwandan genocides. Themes include causes, similarities and peculiarities of these genocides, perpetrators/rescuers issues, genocide reparations and remedies, international reaction, genocide prevention. Assessment may include essays, projects, presentations, and quizzes.

Welcome to ENV 203: Environmental Monitoring

The course is to present general procedures, methods, theories and techniques in the monitoring programs for different environments. Environmental contamination in air, water and wastewater, soils, and food will be discussed with the emphasis on instrument selection and quality control, including documentation, calibration, and sample management. As a science-based, quantitative course, the course will teach students the methods of scientific inquiry, including planning and designing monitoring, biological and physical-chemical analytical methods, data generation and analysis, and effective presentation of the final results. Instructor-led discussion, along with reading, written, and practical assignments.

Increasingly lawyers, because of their insight into public policy, are called upon to use their skills to advocate in the court of public opinion and other fora beyond the formal courtroom and deliberative assembly. This course aims to equip students with models and skills to be effective public advocates. In addition to learning theoretical models and case studies, students will be called upon to design advocacy strategies and make written and oral presentations in simulations of public deliberation.

This course focuses on school/classroom-based assessment. It provides the latest information on the theoretical principles of language testing and assessment and discusses the implementation of the principles in real life practices. The primary focus of the course being language assessment in a classroom context, the course addresses the importance of assessment for learning and of learning. In addition, the course provides the learners with knowledge and skills required for critically examining the existing tests and selecting or developing appropriate tests for their own academic context/s.

Three hours of instructor-led discussion per week.


Courses